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Archive for the ‘Economics’ Category

Fluctuating Incomes and Cool Graphs

07/03/2011 2 comments

So this post is going to be a better explanation and answering of the questions posed in “Spreading Vs. Clumping” (part1 and part 2). I asked a lot of questions in these, and even I wasn’t satisfied with the answers that I gave. I think it’s time to attack the beast, with a little help from Paul Gebel. Here’s the story:

When I began my look into Settlers of Catan through my math-lenses, I tweeted about it. Paul somehow found it, and has been a great encouragement since then. The other day, he tweeted something about the “resource curse”, which sounded extremely Catanish. Upon reading it, I found that it was exactly relating to how I wanted to describe fluctuating income.

So, that brings us here. I’m going to follow the format I did last time with introducing my analysis with one of my tweets:

So, there’s a couple of jobs to do. First, the definition of “resource curse” needs to be applied to a Catan setting. Then, sine curves need to be used to help model incomes in Catan. Let’s start with “resource curse”. Read more…

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What Now?

23/02/2011 1 comment

So as of December, I finished my mathematical analysis and presented it to the Math faculty and all of that.

So now what? Do I leave this blog to vanish into the depths of the internet, never to impart Settlers knowledge to anyone again? Well, I’ve been analyzing Settlers strategy based on the statistics I took and based on economic principles. Now that the mathematical analysis has been submitted for grading, I can delve into some of the more complex economic situations that the game presents.

I’ll get into that a little more later (I need to brush up on my playing so I can talk about things correctly), but for now, I’ll share a short story that indicates the importance of ¬†knowing the economics of Settlers in trying to optimize strategy. Read more…

Trading – People, Ports, or Production?

29/11/2010 1 comment

Settlers has a lot of trading in it. What’s the best way to do it? I’ve played with people who swear that it’s more advantageous to not trade with anyone until you have 5 points(relying on their own production), and I’ve played with people who only ever used the set rates of 4:1 or the 3:1/2:1 ports to trade.

From an economics standpoint, it is not advantageous to cut yourself off from trading with other players. The main reasoning that I have heard to discourage trading with opponents is the fact that you are directly giving an opponent a resource that he/she deems valuable. Why not keep it for yourself and not help them? The fact is that whether you participate in the trading or not, there is a market available to trade resources at a changing price, and your opponents will participate in it whether you do or not. In fact, the maximum participation in the market will give the most stability and fairness to the pricing of each resources. My advice is then to participate in the trading between players, but with the correct knowledge and foresight. A beneficial trade is one where each player is receiving resources that help him/her the same as the other. Trades need to be mutually beneficial and to the same degree of benefit. Read more…

Manipulating Market Price

21/10/2010 7 comments

As of now, I’ve looked at a trend in development strategy that I’ve seen, and now I’m looking at pricing. There’s not much strategy here (or at least anything past a beginner/intermediate level), and you might be a little annoyed – isn’t this supposed to be a blog outlining the best strategy for Settlers? We’re getting there. Don’t worry.

As I said last time, value is determined by the market. For some, this is a flashback to any introductory economics class taken previously. For the rest of you, here’s the rundown: when you graph the supply curve of a product and the demand curve of that same product on the same axes, we can find the market price (or equilibrium) by where they cross. If the demand goes up (by a shift of the demand curve to the right), the equilibrium price will move up. If the supply goes up (by a shift of the supply curve to the right) the equilibrium price will go down.

So what does this mean for Settlers? Read more…

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