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Posts Tagged ‘tweets’

The Brick-Wood Paradox

22/05/2011 5 comments

When I first started letting people see some of the research I had done (by showing friends and posting here mainly), it was received with a lot of encouragement, and some follow-up questions, the most prominent of which I have dubbed the “Brick-Wood Paradox”. As quoted from a commenter:

Why [are] brick and wood so different in their value? They are used for the same things, they should be similar.

This is a tricky question. It’s a great observation – one that I missed in my first analysis. Brick and wood are used together in building roads and in building settlements, and neither are used for anything else. As demand for roads and/or settlements changes, the demands for brick and wood should change together, giving them the same “price” or value. At least, that is the intuitive comment made by many. My analysis holds to wildly different values for brick and wood. I believe that my analysis is not completely wrong (I’m not going to claim that it is the “God’s Word” of Settler’s strategy, though). These two facts led me to investigate this paradox.

@DevelopingCatan

The first observation (and most elementary – other people have made it since) is that the difference in value must come from the difference in number of tiles. There is no difference between wood and brick in their use, so the difference in value must come from their only difference in the game. This scared me at first. If the problem is that there is a difference between number of tiles, did I not equalize the resources correctly, independent of how many tiles there were? If there was any disparity between them, wouldn’t supply/demand say that the lesser available one is worth more? Is my analysis of ore wrong (since it is the other resource with only 3 tiles)? I hope not (and I don’t think it is). Read more…

Fluctuating Incomes and Cool Graphs

07/03/2011 2 comments

So this post is going to be a better explanation and answering of the questions posed in “Spreading Vs. Clumping” (part1 and part 2). I asked a lot of questions in these, and even I wasn’t satisfied with the answers that I gave. I think it’s time to attack the beast, with a little help from Paul Gebel. Here’s the story:

When I began my look into Settlers of Catan through my math-lenses, I tweeted about it. Paul somehow found it, and has been a great encouragement since then. The other day, he tweeted something about the “resource curse”, which sounded extremely Catanish. Upon reading it, I found that it was exactly relating to how I wanted to describe fluctuating income.

So, that brings us here. I’m going to follow the format I did last time with introducing my analysis with one of my tweets:

So, there’s a couple of jobs to do. First, the definition of “resource curse” needs to be applied to a Catan setting. Then, sine curves need to be used to help model incomes in Catan. Let’s start with “resource curse”. Read more…

Appearances and Showing Your Hand

28/02/2011 3 comments

Some of you might have seen this tweet the other day, and thought about what it means:

Appearances: I’m not talking about what each player looks like – I’m talking about how much of your strategy you show. Now, to some, this might be an obvious little bit of strategy: “Don’t let my opponent know what I’m going to do next.” Others might have never have thought about it.

In my games played after the above tweet was posted, I really kept track of how people reacted to my moves. I noticed that it’s very tough to win when you have a good start to the game – people start to attack you (with good reason) and if somebody happens to when somebody inevitably does pass you, it is extremely difficult to bounce back. But is it ok to limit yourself at the beginning of the game just to stay under the radar? Read more…

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